The new series of drawings by Al Munro examining the arrangement of atoms within common foodstuffs including salt, sugar and vinegar, are featured in the current exhibition Art + Food: Beyond the Still Life at Brenda May Gallery in Sydney. In her artist statement, Munro writes “I am interesting in using drawing-based media to examine processes of inscription and translation in relation to scientific representations of the natural world. The work in this exhibition stems from research in crystallographic image collections in Australia and the UK. Crystallography is the field of science which studies and maps the arrangement of atoms within a solid. My attraction to crystallographic diagrams has been due to their translation of the natural world into the visual and mathematical language of geometry and pattern; the endlessly repeating grids of complex symmetries which map the molecular structure of all organic and inorganic matter hold an endless fascination for me.”

Al Munro, Salt Diffraction, 2012

pencil and pigment marker on paper, 35 x 35cm, Courtesy the Artist and Brenda May Gallery

“The drawings in the series Patterns from the invisible world take a number of complex crystallographic grids as their starting point. By using the intersections of the grid lines as a template, I map a random series of points in space to create new maps of an undiscovered invisible world”. Salt Diffraction can be viewed at Brenda May Gallery until Saturday 20 October as part of the curated exhibition Art + Food: Beyond the Still Life.

 

{Lemon Salt}

zest of 2 lemons

salt

Using a microplane, zest the lemons and mix with the salt. Lay the salt out in a thin layer on a baking tray and bake for about 20 minutes on 180C to draw out any remaining moisture. Break up the salt with a fork and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

{Chili Salt}

2 chilies

salt

Finely mince the chilies and mix with the salt. Lay the salt out in a thin layer on a baking tray and bake for about 20 minutes on 180C to draw out any remaining moisture. Break up the salt with a fork and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

 

{Rosemary Salt}

1 sprig fresh rosemary (about 1 tablespoon minced)

salt

Using a mortar and pestle, pound the rosemary and salt together for 2-3 minutes until the oils from the herb are extracted. I prefer to use this salt fresh on lamb or as a topping for focaccia. By using the fresh rosemary, the piney flavour is preserved however this flavoured salt will not keep for more than a couple of days. I store this salt in the refrigerator.